Polk Moms

Connecting moms in Polk County, Fla.

I would love to get some feedback on this subject.  We have decided that our family is complete.  I definitely don't want to get cut for a tubal.  I was considering the new permenant method known as Essure, but it is still fairly new and I don't think enough has been documented on possible long term side effects.  My other option is an IUD.  It is removal and has to be replaced every five years.  I would love to hear any stories you may have of getting the procedure or knowing someone who has....the side effects, the positve comments and the negative comments.  If anyone has a DR. preference let me know why.  I would appreciate any info on this subject.

Views: 288

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I had an IUD and was VERY happy with it. Insertion was a piece of cake, the only "side effect" I had was heavier periods - although friends I've talked to actually had lighter ones and my Dr said it was rare to have heavier. And they weren't AWFUL or longer - just heavier. The only reason I had it removed (after 3 and a half years) is I decided I wanted another baby (silly fool I was, I had 2 more, LOL). I've finally had a tubal, last year - I also was uneasy with Essure and didn't want to have to think about birth control again, even only every 5 years. I had the IUD in Jacksonville so I can't recommend a Dr for one, although I was not at all happy with my Dr down here that did the tubal, although I don't want to put her name on a public board.
I have a Mirena and have had it for 4 years. I have only taken pills (various kinds) so I cannot compare it to all types of bc BUT I believe it to be wonderful!
I have had no side effects that are negative. I have not gained weight, etc. Basically, the only thing you notice is that you (can) have no period and I haven't had one in 4 years. So to me it is absolutely wonderful. Other than that it is kind of put it in and forget it...LOL!
Now when it was put in, there was a lot of cramping like a bad period but nothing too horrible......now we will see how the replacement goes next year.
But for my insurance, all I had to pay was the co-pay so this versus the monthly cost of pills and not to mention the estrogen issues I have with migraines (Mirena doesn't have estrogen) so it was a positive in more than one aspect.
Now if you insurance doesn't cover it, this thing costs like $2000 so make sure to check with your insurance.
I see Dr. Schwartz at WC. She did wonderful and I don't know if you're looking for a new doctor or what your situation is but any OB/GYN can do it.
LOL, I have Dr. Pamela Schwartz (LOVE HER), and she is the one reccomending the Mirena (she says primarily due to the fact that it CAN be removed/reversed if problems persist (bleeding issues, cysts, etc). It was just so weird to hear her talk about it in such a positive light when about five years back all I seemed to hear was negative comments about it. Thanks for the feedback!
Thanks for the info...my doc did say that you were my likely to have lighter or no periods rather than
heavier. So far it's looking good for the Mirena, I am making a decision within the next month!


Alicia (Alsan) said:
I had an IUD and was VERY happy with it. Insertion was a piece of cake, the only "side effect" I had was heavier periods - although friends I've talked to actually had lighter ones and my Dr said it was rare to have heavier. And they weren't AWFUL or longer - just heavier. The only reason I had it removed (after 3 and a half years) is I decided I wanted another baby (silly fool I was, I had 2 more, LOL). I've finally had a tubal, last year - I also was uneasy with Essure and didn't want to have to think about birth control again, even only every 5 years. I had the IUD in Jacksonville so I can't recommend a Dr for one, although I was not at all happy with my Dr down here that did the tubal, although I don't want to put her name on a public board.
I am on my second Mirena...had one since 2005 to control symptoms from my polycystic ovary disease. Had my last period in April of 2006...since then nothing. Removal and reinsertion ws fine - done on the same day. This is the only thing that saved me from a full hysterectomy....in my book it's the best thing going.
I have not had any personal experience but have two friends that have one. One is the Mirena, the other is a different brand. Both had issues. The friend with the Mirena had cramping with the insertion and got pretty severe cramps around her monthly time, even though she started having no periods, she still got the cramps. My other friend had pretty bad issues from the beginning and had to be put on hormone therapy for about a month to control the side effects. Both are now doing better and love them.
I decided against the Mirena because one doctor told me I may not be a good candidate for it. I am very whimpy and often feel faint during/after pelvic/pap. I was told there is a nerve near the cervix that can trigger fainting...perhaps my nerve is a lot more sensitive??! I think it's mostly psychological! I'm just a big baby. I also have a tilted uterus (pretty common) and was told that it can make these procedures a bit more uncomfortable.

Also, I was really looking for a hormone free option. The Mirena has hormones, but they are not ingested orally, so I guess one could argue that they are not as bad for you. I asked about the old school copper IUD with no hormones and the OBGYN said they have a lot of side effects (heavy bleeding). I just wanted to avoid any drugs all together. I've had to take too many in my life! I am convinced the pill caused a lot of my health problems (mysteriously, I started having skin allergies at age 17, immediately after going on the pill...but no doctors ever suspected it). Hormones in the pill form also kill your sex drive, and according to many studies, that drive doesn't always come back after you stop the pill. Although hormones can protect against some cancers, they are also linked to some cancers. I saw a warning on Mirena that if you have a history of cancer, not to take it. I have had pre-cancer of the cervix, and my Mom has had breast cancer...and I have had changes in breast tissue that might put me at higher rist for breast cancer.

There was also an old thread about this, and there were quite a few people who got pregnant with IUDs. This can be very dangerous for the baby (and mother, I would imagine). I am not trying to scare you out of it, but I am sure you are looking for the positives and the negatives before making your decision.

If I didn't have the tilted uterus and possible higher cancer risks, I would probably try it. Most types of birth control have some negative side effects or risks. You have to weigh the pros and cons and choose what's right for you.

Jmarr's comment below is one of the reasons I want to come back to this discussion.

Jmarr said:

There was also an old thread about this, and there were quite a few people who got pregnant with IUDs. This can be very dangerous for the baby (and mother, I would imagine). I am not trying to scare you out of it, but I am sure you are looking for the positives and the negatives before making your decision.

She's right, we had an at length topic about IUDs on PolkMoms a few years ago (lost during a software changeover) and it read more like the horrors and dangers of IUDs compared to reviews with a mix of positive and negative.

Michelle's comment rings absolutely true:

about five years back all I seemed to hear was negative comments about it. Thanks for the feedback!


And apparently data proves that there's a bad-rap-cloud hanging over this type of birthcontrol   According to this recent Time Magazine piece Why is the most effective form of birth control also the one no one... use numbers are down in the US compared to other populations in the world.

That's why I want to keep this topic going. I would love to get additional feedback from those that have used IUDs and for those of you in this discussion, what are your current experiences now?

I have a family member that is considering an IUD after it was suggested to her because of her extreme menstrual cycles (cramps and bleeding). I'm feeling a little uneasy about it on her behalf considering past stigma of IUDs.  But, she is a young college student that hasn't had children yet.  I'm not in love with the idea of her being on birth control pills either.

Let me have it, the good and the bad.  What are the stigmas you've heard?   What are your experiences with an IUD?

Funny you brought this up! I just went to a doctor today to discuss options for period problems. He mentioned that many people have regular, very light periods (or no periods at all) after about six months on Mirena, but have some spotting before that. The other 25% or so don't have the same luck..they continue to have spotting and irregular periods.

Those stats aren't good enough for me to go through a painful procedure and possibly have to go through it again to have it reversed if it doesn't work! (I am sure some have a better pain tolerance than me and are fine with trying Mirena...I just have a major phobia of painful gynecological procedures and anything having to do with my uterus for some reason.)

He was supportive and we are trying other options to get my periods under control.

I'm not sure what you religious beliefs might be but IUD's actually terminate pregnancy vs. preventing conception. Many people do not realize that.

That being said, my sister has had IUDs for years and never had issues.

I have never heard that before so I went for a search to see if I could find an answer. This is what I found at FamilyPlanning.Org

How does the IUD work?
How the IUD works in preventing pregnancy is not fully understood. The
most recent studies suggest an IUD prevents pregnancy by stopping
sperm from reaching an egg that your ovaries have released. It does this
by not letting sperm go into the egg. An IUD also changes the lining of
the uterus so an egg does not implant in the lining if it has been fertilized.
Therefore, the egg has no place to grow.

And this from Planned Parenthood

How Does an IUD Work?
Both the copper and hormonal IUDs work mainly by affecting the way sperm move so they can't join with an egg. If sperm cannot join with an egg, pregnancy cannot happen.
For some women, hormonal IUDs may prevent the egg from leaving the ovary. Pregnancy cannot happen if there is no egg to join with sperm. Progestin also prevents pregnancy by thickening a woman's cervical mucus. The mucus blocks sperm and keeps it from joining with an egg.



NativeLKLDRealtor said:

I'm not sure what you religious beliefs might be but IUD's actually terminate pregnancy vs. preventing conception. Many people do not realize that.

That being said, my sister has had IUDs for years and never had issues.

I'm not sure how it works, and that is the first time I have heard that it "actually terminate pregnancy".  But all I have to say, is that I had one inserted back in April and have only had one period since (in the first month after) and I wish I would have done this years ago, yes, it was a painful procedure for me, but well worth it in the end.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2014   Created by Ledger Media.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service