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Student Expelled for Refusing Location Tracking RFID Badge

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Student Expelled for Refusing Location Tracking RFID Badge

 

School makes good on threat of ‘consequences’ for refusing to submit to ‘Mark of the Beast’ ID scheme

Aaron Dykes
Infowars.com
November 19, 2012

After months of protesting a policy requiring high school students to wear an RFID-enabled ID badge around their necks at all times, Andrea Hernandez is being involuntarily withdrawn from John Jay High School in San Antonio effective November 26th, according to a letter sent by the district that has now been made public.

Letter from John Jay High School withdrawing Andrea Hernandez for not submitting to the RFID tracking ID badges.The letter, sent on November 13, informs her father that the Smart ID program, which was phased in with the new school year, is now in “full implementation” and requires all students to comply by wearing the location-tracking badges.

Since Andrea Hernandez has refused to wear the badge, she is being withdrawn from the magnate school and her program at the Science and Engineering Academy, and instead will have to attend William Howard Taft HS, which is not currently involved in the ID scheme, unless she changes her position.

Civil liberties lawyers at the Rutherford Institute told Infowars.com that they are in the process of filing a temporary restraining order petition to prevent the school from kicking Hernandez out until further appeals can be made to resolve the matter. Representatives for John Jay did not return calls for comment by the time of publishing.

Andrea, backed by her family, has claimed the policy violates her religious beliefs and unduly infringes on her privacy. The controversial ID badge includes the photo and name of each student, a barcode tied to the student’s social security number, as well as an RFID chip which pinpoints the exact location of the individual student, including after hours and when the student leaves campus.

The battle over the IDs has been an ongoing saga. The Hernandez family has previously attended several school board meetings, organized protests and filed formal grievances with the district over the matter, and has been backed by numerous civil rights advocates.

Infowars reporters covered a protest that took place in early October, following up with appearances by the Hernandez family on the Alex Jones Show and the Infowars Nightly News programs.

Texas Students Treated Like Cattle with Mandatory RFID Tags

In response to public outcry and pressure from rights groups, the school has offered to remove the battery and chip, but wouldn’t budge on mandating the ID. Their offer would also require the Hernandez family to end their criticism and agree to comply with and even tout the policy, something Andrea’s father Steve Hernandez finds unacceptable.

Steve Hernandez stated, “[A]s part of the accommodation my daughter and I would have to agree to stop criticizing the program and publicly support … it. I told [the Deputy Superintendent] that was unacceptable because it would imply an endorsement of the district’s policy and my daughter and I should not have to give up our constitutional rights to speak out against a program that we feel is wrong.”

Andrea has instead agreed to carry her original ID card, which was issued when she began at the school, and was told would be valid for her entire four years there.

But she has already been effectively punished for her non-compliance. She was not allowed to vote for Homecoming King & Queen because she didn’t have the proper identification, and has also been barred from some school functions. The school originally threatened to suspend, fine, or involuntarily transfer students who wouldn’t wear the ID once the program was fully instituted.

Deputy Superintendent Ray Galindo vowed in October that the consequences would be worse if Andrea did not change her mind: “I urge you to accept this solution so that your child’s instructional program will not be affected. As we discussed, there will be consequences for refusal to wear an ID card as we begin to move forward with full implementation,” Galindo wrote.

Hernandez’ case first made news back in August, when the school tried to impose the new technology at the start of the school year. John Jay HS, along with other participating schools, stands to receive $2 million dollars in state funding for a program supposedly instituted to reduce tardiness and truancy. However, Hernandez and other students only qualified for the magnate school by having good attendance, grades and test scores in the first place.

Christian Family Refuses Mandatory RFID Chip at Texas School

For many Christian families, including the Hernandez’, the mandatory policy is eerily close to the predictions of Revelations 13: 16-18, which warns of the Mark of the Beast:

16 He causes all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hand or on their foreheads, 17 and that no one may buy or sell except one who has the mark or[a] the name of the beast, or the number of his name. 18 Here is wisdom. Let him who has understanding calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man: His number is 666. (New King James Version)

As such, the policy has also been considered a violation of the First Amendment to the Bill of Rights, which guarantees the right to free speech and freedom of religion. Many also consider it to be an unreasonable and unwarranted violation of privacy, protected under the Fourth Amendment.

Gov’t Bribing School Children with Candy to Wear RFID Chip

 

Tags: RFID, expelled, school

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The letter says she was given the option to wear the badge with the battery and location device removed. It is a charter school. If she doesn't want to follow their rules, I see no reason why she should be allowed to attend. I find this entire business silly. Does she have a cell phone? Does she know how they work? 

Hey, if some of you have no problems with all that, then GREAT !!!

This is yet another reason my kids are home schooled - although soon this insanity will start spilling over into ALL our lives no matter how or where we school our children. 

The slippery-slope just got more slippery.

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I believe all employers of over five employees, require RFID's to be worn during during their employment. All visitors to government offices will also be pinned with RFID's. 

While this is just the start. It's a step in the right direction to protect us all.

Freedom?

That's for weirdos.

Give me security without rights. That's what we searching for.

 

 

 

Excuse me ma'am, but I think I found your snark.  



Janice C Cook said:

Excuse me ma'am, but I think I found your snark.  


 

 

You are correct Janice. Freedom is just an imaginary state of mind by weak humans. Gone like smoke rings at the slightest disturbance. Who needs personal responsiblity, when we have others to dictiate for us. It is far easier to let others think for us too. 

I am confused at to how students being asked to follow guidelines is somehow trampling on the freedom and free thought of collective society. With your vague sarcasm, you seem to be taking a rather large leap down the logically flawed slippery slope argument. 

I am all for freedom of thought. However, I am no anarchist. Rules are necessary in order for the great machine that we call civilization to work. If this student does not like the rules, even though an alternative has been offered to her, she is free to attend another school with rules better suited to her needs. Freedom doesn't mean we get to do as we please in spite of how it may negatively influences others. Now, I am not in favor of placing tracking devices on students in school, though I see why this seems to be appealing in a post Jonesboro/Columbine/Virginia Tech... age. However, if she doesn't like the big brother policy, she can go to another school. In this instance, it is clear that the school offered a reasonable alternative.



Janice C Cook said:

I am confused at to how students being asked to follow guidelines is somehow trampling on the freedom and free thought of collective society. With your vague sarcasm, you seem to be taking a rather large leap down the logically flawed slippery slope argument. 

I am all for freedom of thought. However, I am no anarchist. Rules are necessary in order for the great machine that we call civilization to work. If this student does not like the rules, even though an alternative has been offered to her, she is free to attend another school with rules better suited to her needs. Freedom doesn't mean we get to do as we please in spite of how it may negatively influences others. Now, I am not in favor of placing tracking devices on students in school, though I see why this seems to be appealing in a post Jonesboro/Columbine/Virginia Tech... age. However, if she doesn't like the big brother policy, she can go to another school. In this instance, it is clear that the school offered a reasonable alternative.


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Slippery slope has appeared to work consistenly in the past. "Your" opinion that this is taking a rather large leap down the logically flawed slippery slope argument, seems to be unusally dismissive of societal factual changes in the past. Whether one see those changes as good or not, most change without the point of a gun, occur many time, with small minute changes in thought. Concerning "your" accucation of vague sarcasm on my part. I was only using "your" vague use of a word, that was used as "sarcasam" toward this writer. It appears what fair to the goose, is fair to the goose only. Gander be plucked. 

Take this test Janice, ask those you come across in the following weeks, what does "snark" imply? Heck, you could also asked the average high school student when the American civil war started, plus or minus ten years. Include a few other simple, I mean really simple test of history, government and geography. This little quiz includes most students with GPA's over 3.0 unweighted. Very interesting results. Of course with the new Lincoln movie coming out, the passing results will hopefully improve.

Janice, do you really feel that this RFID requirement will stop with a private school? Really? I would say that it will be a short time before we hear of a public school requiring their students to wear these or similar devices.

But you seem to have missed the meat of this argument and my comment. What is too much? On any action that restricts the free actions of another. That question does not seem to be a sacrasic or abusive question.

I would be very surprised if you would not agree, that many will trade all or part of their free will, for supposed security. The emphasis on "supposed."

So you gladly delegate the control of your and your families free will to others?

Just how far does this go? How about cameras controlled by the state (city) at all entrances to your doors and in your yard? Not talking about AZD alarm system that "you" set up and control. But controlled by the state, watching your every move and coming and goings.

Such security!

P.S.  I believe in rules too. But who sets the rules and why?

 

I am all for open debate and probing questions, but this is not how you worded your initial statement. Your second train of thought was at the very least plain and thought provoking. But no, slippery slope doesn't consistently work. Though there is cause a effect, just because one institution implements a policy does not mean every institution will follow. Look at metal detectors. They are implemented in some schools in certain areas, but not in others. In some work places, all employees are required to swipe badges to enter into their work stations, but this does not mean every industry and every employer follows suit. 

I don't believe in raising alarms because one group of people believes tracking devices in identification cards are a mark of the beast. The point is that no one is asking this girl to wear a tracking device at home, or even in school for that matter since they offered an alternative. Yet, you seem to make the assumption that this instance is just the beginning of the ruination of societal freedoms. I think it is exaggeration. 

Janice, you criticise my first comment which was obviously written as a tongue-n-cheek statement, but yet it got your attention. So much so, that like a hound on a coon scent, you won't let go. Can't let go. Because there "was" something there, a scent of truth that you can't shake. 

In regards to your comment that "slippery slope doesn't consistently work."  Says who? You? But let me clarify the slippery slope subject. I did not say "all", "always", "never" in my use of that term. Not even most was used.  How you thought that I said that the RFID device would be used in all situations is just beyond my reasoning level. I'm open to your clarification and substantiation of what I wrote and how you came up with that position. Which brings up a current issue with red light cameras springing up more and more in communties around the country. So I'll lead with this....I personally support red light cameras in some areas and some cases. Not completely opposed to their use. But do see abuses and more to come as their original use was once at least publically stated, for safety concerns. I believe only a minority would say that money revenue for the entity controlling those cameras is not one of the major reason for the continued growth in their use. So if I were to take the stance that all traffic cameras were bad, and that they were expanding their use, growing leaps and bounds, in the areas that they were being set up. Am i saying that a camera will also be set up at the end of dog pond road, or missy sue's lane, etc.  Nope. Not saying that at all. Neither are those that do oppose all or most traffic cameras. Only that the purpose for placing these cameras has been distorted and abuse in the case of adding revenue for the city and not public safety in many cases.

So my concerns with RFID's are not that all schools, or all facilities will require their use. But that their use should be discussed, not mandated. There should be justification for how their use will stop something like Columbine, Jonesboro, Virginia Tech, etc. RFID's would not have stopped any of those incidents just mentioned.

Janice, what we have here is a difference of priorties between the two of us. You have every right to your opinion. Just as others do, including myself. You are not alone, many seek security over freedom when their roles collide over the same space that often times cannot reside in that same spot. 

The primrose path in the end, usually does not lead to betterment of self or mankind. Nor does indirect labeling of others by using loaded terms such as your use of the "mark of the beast" in what you yourself said should be an open debate with probing questions. 
 
Janice C Cook said:

I am all for open debate and probing questions, but this is not how you worded your initial statement. Your second train of thought was at the very least plain and thought provoking. But no, slippery slope doesn't consistently work. Though there is cause a effect, just because one institution implements a policy does not mean every institution will follow. Look at metal detectors. They are implemented in some schools in certain areas, but not in others. In some work places, all employees are required to swipe badges to enter into their work stations, but this does not mean every industry and every employer follows suit. 

I don't believe in raising alarms because one group of people believes tracking devices in identification cards are a mark of the beast. The point is that no one is asking this girl to wear a tracking device at home, or even in school for that matter since they offered an alternative. Yet, you seem to make the assumption that this instance is just the beginning of the ruination of societal freedoms. I think it is exaggeration. 

The Idea of America reviewed by Jeffrey Tucker
There are occasions in American life -- and they come too often these days -- when you want to scream: "What the heck has happened to this country?!" Everyone encounters events that strike a particular nerve, some egregious violations of the norms for a free country that cut very deeply and personally.
We wonder: Do we even remember what it means to be free? If not -- and I think not -- The Idea of America: What It Was and How It Was Lost, a collection of bracing reminders from our past, as edited by William Bonner and Pierre Lemieux, is the essential book of our time.
I'll just mention two outrages that occur first to me. In the last six months, I came back to the country twice from international travel, once by plane and once by car. The car scene shocked me. The lines were ridiculously long, and border control agents, clad in dark glasses and boots and wearing enough weaponry to fight an invading army, ran up and down the lines with large dogs. Periodically, U.S. border control would throw open doors of cars and vans and let the dogs run through, while the driver sat there poker-faced and trying to stay calm and pretending not to object.
When I finally got to the customs window, I was questioned -- not like a citizen of the country, but like a likely terrorist. The agent wanted to know everything about me: home, work, where I had been and why, whether I would stay somewhere before getting to my destination, family composition and other matters that just creeped me out. I realized, immediately, that there was no question he could ask me that I could refuse to answer, and I had to do this politely.
That's power.
The second time I entered the country was by plane, and there were two full re-scans of bags on the way in, in addition to the passport check, and a long round of questioning. There were no running dogs this time; the passengers were the dogs, and we were all on the agents' leashes. Whatever they ordered us to do, we did, no matter how irrational. We moved here and there in lock step and total silence. One step out of line, and you are guaranteed to be yelled at. At one point, an armed agent began to talk loudly and with a sense of ridicule about the clothes I was wearing, and went out of his way to make sure everyone else heard him. I could do nothing but smile as if I were being complimented by a friend.
That's power.
Of course, these cases are nothing like the reports you hear almost daily about the abuse and outrages from domestic travel, which now, routinely, requires everyone to submit to digital strip searches. We have come to expect this. We can hardly escape the presence of the police in our lives. I vaguely remember, when I was young, that I thought of the police as servants of the people. Now their presence strikes fear in the heart, and they are everywhere, always operating under the presumption that they have total power, and you and I have absolutely none.
You hear slogans about the "land of the free," and we still sing patriotic songs at the ballpark -- and even at church on Sunday -- and these songs are always about our blessed liberty, the battles of our ancestors against tyranny, the special love of liberty that animates our heritage and national self-identity. The contrast with reality grows more stark by the day.
And it isn't just about our personal liberty and our freedom to move about with a sense that we are exercising our rights. It hits us in the economic realm, where no goods or services change hands that aren't subject to the total control of the leviathan state. No business is really safe from being bludgeoned by legislatures, regulators and the tax police, while objecting makes you only more of a target.
Few dare say it publicly: America has become a police state. All the signs are in place, among which the world's largest prison population. If we are not a police state, one must ask: What are the indicators that will tell us that we've crossed the line? What are signs we haven't yet seen? We can debate all day about when, precisely, the descent began, but there can be no doubt when the slide into the despotic abyss became precipitous. It was after the terrorists hit on Sept. 11 in 2001. The terrorists wanted to deliver a blow to freedom. Our national leaders swore the terrorists would never win, and then spent the following 10 years delivering relentless and massive blows to liberty as we had known it.
The decline has been fast, but not fast enough for people to be as shocked as they should be. Freedom is a state of being that is difficult to recall once it is gone. We adapt to the new reality the way people adapt to degenerative diseases, grateful for slight respites from pain and completely despairing of ever feeling healthy and well again.
What's more, all the time we spend obeying, complying and pretending to be malleable -- in order to stay out of trouble -- ends up socializing us, and even changing our outlook on life. As in the Orwell novel, we have adjusted to government control as the new normal. The loudspeakers blared that all of this is in the interest of our security and well-being. These people who are stripping us, robbing us, humiliating us, impoverishing us are doing it all for our own good. We never fully believe it, but the message still affects our outlook.
The editors of The Idea of America are urging a serious national self-assessment. They argue that freedom is the only theme that fully and truly animates the traditional American spirit. We are not united in religion, race or creed, but we do have this wonderful history of rebellion against power in favor of human rights and freedom from tyranny. For this reason, the book begins with the essential founding documents, which, if taken seriously, make a case for radical freedom not as something granted by government, but as something that we possess as a matter of right.
The love of liberty is rooted in our Colonial past, and it is thrilling to see Murray Rothbard's excellent account of the pre-revolutionary past printed here, with follow-ups to make the point by Patrick Henry and Thomas Paine. Lord Acton makes the next appearance with a clarifying essay about the whole point of the American Revolution, which was not independence as such, but liberty. He forcefully argues that the right of secession, the right to annul laws, the right to say no to the tyrant, the right to leave the system, constitute great contribution of America to political history. As you read, you wonder where these voices are today and what would happen to them if they spoke up in modern versions of the same thoughts. These revolutionaries are pushing ideas that the modern regime seeks to bury, and even criminalize.
The voice of the new country and its voluntaristic themes is provided by Alexis de Tocqueville, along with the writings of James Madison. As Bonner and Lemieux argue in their own contributions, the idea of anarchism, that is, living without a state, has always been just beneath the surface of American ideology. Here, they bring it to the surface with an essay by proto-anarchist J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, who said of America, "We have no princes for whom we toil, starve and bleed: We are the most perfect society now existing in the world."
The anarchist strain continues with marvelous writings by Thomas Jefferson, Henry David Thoreau, Voltairine de Cleyre, plus some court decisions reinforcing gun rights. The book ends with another reminder that American is an open society that is welcoming to newcomers. The final choice of Rose Wilder Lane's "Give Me Liberty" is inspired.
The value of this book is dramatically heightened by the additional material from Bonner, whose clear prose and incisive intellect is on display here, both in the foreword and the afterword, as well as Lemieux, whose introduction made my blood boil with all his examples of government gone mad in our time. Bonner in particular offers an intriguing possibility that the future of the true America has nothing to do with geography; it exists where the free minds and free hearts exist. The digitization of the world opens up new opportunities for just this.
The contrast is stark: what America was meant to be and what it has become. It can be painful to take this kind of careful look. Truly honest appraisals of this sort are rare. Adapting, going along, pretending not to notice, are all easier strategies to deal with the grim situation we face. But this is not the way America's founders dealt with their problems. This book might inspire us to think and act more like we should.
We should prepare.
In the words of Thomas Paine:

"O ye that love mankind! Ye that dare oppose, not only the tyranny, but the tyrant, stand forth! Every spot of the Old World is overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been hunted round the globe. Asia and Africa have long expelled her. Europe regards her like a stranger, and England hath given her warning to depart. O! receive the fugitive, and prepare in time an asylum for mankind."

Now, I am answered other thoughts you brought up in a separate tab.

It is a shame that many people are uneducated and unaware. Some are victims of their own laziness, and others are victims of a society in which education systems vary in curriculum standards. Some have simply forgotten what has been asked of them to learn. In a senior level college anthropology class I took, filled with the type of students known to be academics and knowledge seekers, only a few could answer every question asked on a pop quiz/civics exam (Notice I didn't say a few of us. I missed one.). Many of us knew most of the answers, but it did illustrate to us our limited knowledge on a subject area we were born to be experts in. I am sure if every citizen of the U.S. took that test, there would be a high failure rate. It is sad really, but the problem could be mitigated by all states following a national set of standards set by the best and brightest in their fields, (Did you know that Florida refuses to follow the national guidelines for education in science even though the Governor says he wants us to excel in this area? We are in the dark ages, here.), a greater emphasis on educational milestones over standardized testing, higher pay for teachers (we get what we pay for)... I am sure you can add to this list.

On the topic of freedom. I do believe we all are willing to trade some of our freedom for some supposed security. For example, if I wanted to get to work quickly, I could drive as fast as I can down 98, passing through red lights and school zones at will. Yet, I don't. I may be theoretically free to do so, but there are consequences that reach much further than legalities. I wont pass through a red light because it may harm me or someone else and because I wouldn't want someone to pass through a red if I were driving through the green at the same time. In this way, it is supposed safety.Yet, not everyone will follow the rules (I had a women run through a red light and hit me recently); therefore, this sense of safety is tenuous. To move the conversation on to more controversial safety measures, I will move to airport scanners. In order to maintain the relative safety of passengers (and buildings) and because the technologies used by terrorists are getting more advanced, we are forced to go through intrusive scanning measures that erode our freedom of privacy while using these services. Though I am opposed to invasions of privacy, I am also opposed to becoming a burning ball of fire. This is where we have to weigh our feelings. If the dangers to life and limb outweigh the need for privacy, we have to give up a bit of privacy. In the same instance, if we have an issue with this overstepping, we are free to take trains boats, and buses or to drive our personal vehicles. As far as tracking devices go, I do believe that they are a severe overreach if they are forced upon someone on their own personal time. However, because this particular instance occurred in a charter school of choice and the girl, I will say this again, was given the option to not be tracked, no one's freedoms were being impinged upon. Just because a technology exists and is in use does not mean that it will become ubiquitous, nor does it mean that the technology is a problem. I will go back to my initial statement when I say that cell phones are more of a problem than school identification cards. Some parents may like the idea that they will always know that there children can be accounted for. For those who don't, there should be, and in this instance there is, an option to go to another school.

Holy carp. I just realized how long that was. I should be writing my grad application essays. Good Talk. 

Janice C Cook said:

Now, I am answered other thoughts you brought up in a separate tab.

It is a shame that many people are uneducated and unaware. Some are victims of their own laziness, and others are victims of a society in which education systems vary in curriculum standards. Some have simply forgotten what has been asked of them to learn. In a senior level college anthropology class I took, filled with the type of students known to be academics and knowledge seekers, only a few could answer every question asked on a pop quiz/civics exam (Notice I didn't say a few of us. I missed one.). Many of us knew most of the answers, but it did illustrate to us our limited knowledge on a subject area we were born to be experts in. I am sure if every citizen of the U.S. took that test, there would be a high failure rate. It is sad really, but the problem could be mitigated by all states following a national set of standards set by the best and brightest in their fields, (Did you know that Florida refuses to follow the national guidelines for education in science even though the Governor says he wants us to excel in this area? We are in the dark ages, here.), a greater emphasis on educational milestones over standardized testing, higher pay for teachers (we get what we pay for)... I am sure you can add to this list.

On the topic of freedom. I do believe we all are willing to trade some of our freedom for some supposed security. For example, if I wanted to get to work quickly, I could drive as fast as I can down 98, passing through red lights and school zones at will. Yet, I don't. I may be theoretically free to do so, but there are consequences that reach much further than legalities. I wont pass through a red light because it may harm me or someone else and because I wouldn't want someone to pass through a red if I were driving through the green at the same time. In this way, it is supposed safety.Yet, not everyone will follow the rules (I had a women run through a red light and hit me recently); therefore, this sense of safety is tenuous. To move the conversation on to more controversial safety measures, I will move to airport scanners. In order to maintain the relative safety of passengers (and buildings) and because the technologies used by terrorists are getting more advanced, we are forced to go through intrusive scanning measures that erode our freedom of privacy while using these services. Though I am opposed to invasions of privacy, I am also opposed to becoming a burning ball of fire. This is where we have to weigh our feelings. If the dangers to life and limb outweigh the need for privacy, we have to give up a bit of privacy. In the same instance, if we have an issue with this overstepping, we are free to take trains boats, and buses or to drive our personal vehicles. As far as tracking devices go, I do believe that they are a severe overreach if they are forced upon someone on their own personal time. However, because this particular instance occurred in a charter school of choice and the girl, I will say this again, was given the option to not be tracked, no one's freedoms were being impinged upon. Just because a technology exists and is in use does not mean that it will become ubiquitous, nor does it mean that the technology is a problem. I will go back to my initial statement when I say that cell phones are more of a problem than school identification cards. Some parents may like the idea that they will always know that there children can be accounted for. For those who don't, there should be, and in this instance there is, an option to go to another school.

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